NICE NEWS PHOTO COLLECTION OF WORLD WAR I
BRITISH MILITARY MEDAL WINNERS

INTERESTING ORIGINAL NEWS PHOTOGRAPHS OF: FOUR VICTORIA CROSS WINNERS
ALSO THE MILITARY CROSS, SEVERAL D.S.O.'S, A C.M.G., AND A MYSTERY PHOTO

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The Victoria Cross (VC) is a military decoration awarded for valour "in the face of the enemy" to members of armed forces of some Commonwealth countries and previous British Empire territories. It may be awarded to a person of any rank in any service and civilians under military command, and is presented to the recipient by the British monarch during an investiture held at Buckingham Palace. As it is the highest award for bravery in the United Kingdom, it takes precedence over other post-nominals and medals. The VC was introduced in 1856 by Queen Victoria to reward acts of valour during the Crimean War. Since then the medal has been awarded 1,356 times to 1,353 individual recipients. Only 14 medals have been awarded since the end of the Second World War. The medal itself is made from the gunmetal of a weapon supposedly captured at the siege of Sevastopol, but several historians have since questioned the true origin of the gunmetal. Due to its rarity, the VC is highly prized and the medal can reach over £200,000 at auction and there are a number of public and private collections devoted to it, most notably that of Lord Ashcroft, which contains over one-tenth of the total VCs awarded.


Photo measures 5¾" x 7¾" - 145mm x 198mm
Condition: Extremely Fine
Awarded the Victoria Cross

William Hackett (11 June 1873- 27 June 1916) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He was 43 years old, and a Sapper in the 254th Tunnelling Company, Corps of Royal Engineers, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 22 June/23 June 1916 at Shaftesbury Avenue Mine, near Givenchy, France, Sapper Hackett was entombed with four others in a gallery, owing to the explosion of an enemy mine. After working for 24 hours a hole was made and the rescue party outside contacted. Sapper Hackett helped three of the men through the hole and could easily have followed, but refused to leave the fourth man who had been seriously injured. The hole gradually got smaller, but he still refused to leave his injured comrade. Finally the gallery collapsed and although the rescue party worked desperately for four days, they were unable to reach the two men. His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Royal Engineers Museum (Chatham, England).


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Photo measures 5¾" x 7¾" - 145mm x 198mm
Condition: Extremely Fine
Awarded the Victoria Cross

George Stringer (24 July 1889-22 November 1957) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He was 26 years old, and a private in the 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 8 March 1916 at Es Sinn, Mesopotamia, after the capture of an enemy position, Private Stringer was posted on the extreme right of his battalion to guard against any hostile attack. His battalion was subsequently forced back by an enemy counter-attack, but Private Stringer held his ground single-handed and kept back the enemy until all his grenades were used up. His gallant stand saved the flank of his battalion and made a steady withdrawal possible. His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Museum of the Manchesters (Ashton-under-Lyne, England).


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Photo measures 3¾" x 5½" - 95mm x 140mm
Condition: Very Fine w/ vertical crease
Awarded the Victoria Cross

Geoffrey St. George Shillington Cather (born October 11 1890 - died July 2 1916) was born in the Streatham Hill area of south-west London. He was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He was 25 years old, and a lieutenant in the 9th Battalion, The Royal Irish Fusiliers, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 1 July 1916 near Hamel, France, from 7pm till midnight, Lieutenant Cather searched "No Man's Land" and brought in three wounded men. Next morning, at 8am, he continued his search, brought in another wounded man and gave water to others, arranging for their rescue later. Finally, at 10.30am, he took out water to another man and was proceeding further on when he was himself killed. All this was carried out in full view of the enemy and under direct machine-gun fire and intermittent artillery fire. His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Regimental Museum The Royal Irish Fusiliers, (Armagh, Ireland).


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COPYRIGHT PHOTO BY SWAIN
NEW BOND ST., W., SOUTHSEA
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Photo measures 4" x 6" - 93mm x 140mm
Condition: This is a copy we have made from the original negative which is included (shown right)
Awarded the Victoria  Cross

Michael O'Leary can also be considered Canadian. He came to Saskatchewan in 1913 and enlisted in the Royal North West Mounted Police, returning quickly to Ireland on the outbreak of the war a year later. O'Leary and his family returned to Canada after the war and he became an inspector in the Ontario Provincial Police. In 1925 they went to Michigan briefly before returning to England where O'Leary was a linkman in the Mayfair Hotel at London. He re-enlisted during World War II in the Middlesex Regiment, retiring as a major in 1945, and died on August 21, 1961, aged 70, at Whittington Hospital in Highgate. He is buried at Paddington cemetery Mill Hill, London. His Victoria Cross is displayed at The Guards Regimental Headquarters (Irish Guards RHQ) (London, England). O'Leary Lake in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, has been named in his honour.

Michael O'Leary (VC) (September 29, 1890 – August 2, 1961) born Inchigeela, Macroom, County Cork, Ireland was an Irish and Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross. He was 26 years old, and a Lance-Corporal in the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC. On February 1, 1915 at Cuinchy, France, Lance-Corporal O'Leary was one of the storming party which advanced against the enemy's barricades. He rushed to the front and killed five Germans who were holding the first barricade, after which he attacked a second barricade 60 yards further on. This he captured after killing three of the enemy and taking two more of them prisoner. The lance-corporal thus practically took the position by himself and prevented the rest of the attacking party from being fired upon.

The British Army featured a recruiting poster of “O’Leary VC”.


This is the included negative
measures 2¼"x3½"


Photo measures 6⅛" x 8
" - 155mm x 205mm
Condition: Fine but with some serious condition issues: torn corners (not shown) and heavy horizontal crease (shown) breaking through front film. Could be cropped  into an effective torso presentation.
Awarded the Military Cross

Major John Hay Beith (Ian Hay) (April 17, 1876 - September 22, 1952) from Edinburgh, Scotland was a soldier, novelist, and playwright. He was educated at Fettes College, Edinburgh and St. Johns College, Cambridge. He was a second-lieutenant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was in France in April of 1915 and was one of the first 100,000 of Kitchener's Army. He was awarded the Military Cross. He was Director of Public Relations at the War Office (1938-1941). His work was well known for its wit; often quoted is this line from his play, "Housemaster": "What do you mean, funny? Funny-peculiar or funny ha-ha?" From the same play, two characteristic Hay lines, from masters' reports on their pupils: ‘He can translate English into a Greek not spoken in Greece, and Greek into an English not spoken anywhere, with equal facility’. and ‘Despite his natural levity he habitually gravitates towards the bottom.’
     The First Hundred Thousand (1916) is his best-known work, and is marked by the same sharp sense of humor as his other work: "War is hell, and all that, but it has a good deal to recommend it. It wipes out all the small nuisances of peace-time." All In It K(1) Carries On: A Continuation of the First Hundred Thousand (1917) and Carrying On (1917) were also popular books of his. Other works include Tilly of Bloomsbury 1919, The Right Stuff, A Man's Man, A Safety Match, and Happy-Go-Lucky. Beith served as Technical Advisor for Cecil B. DeMille's silent extravaganza, "The Little American" (1917), starring Mary Pickford, and wrote screenplays for several films, including Alfred Hitchcock's "The Thirty-Nine Steps" and "Secret Agent".


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COPYRIGHT CENTRAL NEWS

"Tall, soldierly, Scottish Ian Hay is one of the British writers most read by Britons. His 27 books have had total sales of over three million copies. Few authors have a better background for writing military narratives. A 36-year-old lieutenant in the famed Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, Author Hay emerged from World War I a captain, from the Battle of Loos with the Military Cross. Says Hay: "I think I was given the M.C. for being the only survivor." His First Hundred Thousand became so popular in the U.S. in 1915 that Author Hay was later sent over to whoop it up for the Empire. ("I always get on with Americans," says Hay. "I love them.")"  From Time Magazine, November 8, 1943.


Photo measures 3¾" x 5½" - 95mm x 140mm
Condition: Very Fine w/ tape on top margin (not shown)
Admiral and Sea Lord Sir Cyril Thomas Moulden Fuller
Awarded the:
C.M.G. - Companion of The Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George
D.S.O. - 
Distinguished Service Order


"Captain Fuller, R.N. received three Decorations, the C.M.G., the D.S.O., and the Board of Trade Bronze Medal for Saving Life at Sea.
Captain Fuller has rendered conspicuous service in Nigeria, and the Board of Trade conferred their medal on him in recognition of his gallantry when a whaler capsized in the Njong River. On that occasion he endeavoured to rescue the crew, and while trying to right the boat was twice pulled away by the struggling natives. He succeeded however in saving a number of lives." (Photo Maull & Fox)

Admiral and Sea Lord Sir Cyril Thomas Moulden Fuller was born in 1874, the son of Thomas Fuller of the 18th Hussars. He entered the Royal Navy in 1887 and was promoted to Lieutenant by 1894. The following year saw him promoted to Commander. Promoted to Captain in 1910, he served as the senior naval officer in the Togoland and Cameroon Expeditionary Forces. He was Mentioned in Despatches as a result of his contributions. He also commanded several vessels from 1914 to 1916 to include H.M.S. Cumberland, H.M.S. Challenger and H.M.S. Astraea. He received his C.M.G. (1915) and D.S.O. (1916) during this timeframe. From 1916 to 1917, he commanded the new battle cruiser H.M.S. Repulse. Following this, he served as the Director of Plans Division, Naval War Staff until 1920. One of his missions during this timeframe was to serve as the head of the British Naval Section Peace Conference in Paris from 1919 to 1920. He received his C.B. during this timeframe. The next two years saw him assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. He was promoted to Rear-Admiral during this timeframe (1921). From 1922-1923 he served as the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff. He served as the 3rd Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy from 1923 to 1925. Following this, he took command of the Battle Cruiser Squadron, Atlantic Fleet. He served in H.M.S. Hood at this time. He held this position until 1927. During this timeframe, he was promoted to Vice-Admiral (1926). After leaving Hood, Sir Cyril served as the Commander in Chief America and West Indies Station. In 1928 he received the KCB. He held this position until 1930, when he was promoted to Admiral and became the 2nd Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Personnel. This position was held until 1932. He retired from military service in 1935. In addition to his titles and military honours, Sir Cyril had also been awarded the Board of Trade Life Saving Medal, Commander Legion of Honour, Commander of the Order of the Crown (Italy), Order of the Rising Sun, Croix de Guerre and US Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Sir Cyril Fuller died on 1 February 1942.


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PHOTO SUPPLIED
CENTRAL NEWS


Photo measures
" x 7½" - 140mm x 190mm
Condition: Fine w/ upper left folds and 20mm tear upper right

Lieutenant Commander Warden
Awarded the Albert Medal 1st Class

The Albert Medal for Lifesaving was instituted by Royal Warrant on 7 March 1866 and discontinued in 1971. The medal was named in memory of the Prince Albert and was originally awarded to recognize saving life at sea. The original medal had a blue ribbon 5/8" (16 mm) wide with 2 white stripes. A further Royal Warrant in 1867 created two classes of Albert Medal, the first in gold and bronze and the second in bronze, both enamelled in blue, and the ribbon of the first class changed to 1 3/8" (35 mm) wide with 4 white stripes.
In 1877, the medal was extended to cover saving life on land and from this point there are two medals with different inscriptions to depict which they were awarded for. The land version was enamelled in red, with a red ribbon. The titles of the medals changed in 1917, the gold "Albert Medal, first class" becoming the "Albert Medal in gold" and the bronze "Albert Medal, second class" being known as just the "Albert Medal". Only 25 Albert Medals, 1st Class, or Gold, were issued for saving life at Sea.


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COPYRIGHT/ NEWSPAPER ILLUSTRATIONS 161A STRAND, W. C.
By our Staff Photographer
Special War service


Photo measures " x 5
¾" - 197mm x 145mm
Condition: Very Fine

Lieutenant Chapman & Commander Horton
Awarded the Distinguished Service Order

The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. The DSO was instituted on 6 September 1886 by Queen Victoria in a Royal Warrant published on 9 November. Typically, awarded to officers ranked Major (or its equivalent) or higher, the honour was sometimes awarded to especially valorous junior officers. 8,981 DSOs were awarded during World War I, each award being announced in the London Gazette.

The order was established for rewarding individual instances of meritorious or distinguished service in war. It was a military order, until recently for officers only, and normally given for service under fire or under conditions equivalent to service in actual combat with the enemy, although it was awarded between 1914 and 1916 under circumstances which could not be regarded as under fire (often to staff officers, which caused resentment among front-line officers). After 1 January 1917, commanders in the field were instructed to recommend this award only for those serving under fire. Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone Mentioned in Despatches. The order is generally given to officers in command, above the rank of Captain. A number of more junior officers were awarded the DSO, and this was often regarded as an acknowledgement that the officer had only just missed out on the award of the Victoria Cross.


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LAGNIAPPE
Here's a little fun mystery for you. Can you figure out who these soldiers are?
Perhaps something in their uniforms, their insignia or maybe their jaunty batons?
This is included in the set. No notations on the back of photo.